Jason Doucette

Jason, the captain of Jason D 2000, has been coming to North Rustico harbour since he was a young kid. Like many island lobster fishers, fishing runs in Jason’s family. His father Barry, is also a lobster fisher and is who he purchased his lobster licence from. His father still goes out on the water with Jason and his brother, Jamie almost daily. Jason’s love for fishing came from a young age. Ever since he started going out with his father, he knew he wanted to be a fisher. His passion for the water and the challenge that fishing brings is why he loves it. He began his fishing career with his uncle and then jumped ships to fish with his dad. After 29 years on the water, his love for fishing hasn’t diminished.

If you ask Jason what the most challenging parts of fishing are, he will tell you it’s all the unknowns:

“Not knowing the price of lobster that year, how plentiful the catch will be, and what the weather will be like on any given day, make fishing a challenge. Fishers have been very fortunate to have prosperous seasons for the last couple of years, despite many challenges they have had to navigate.” 

Being a successful fisher takes passion, knowledge and hard work. Jason believes that there is a skill to fishing that is often overlooked, and those who want to be successful have to be willing to work.

“Not every day on the water is nice and easy, and there are constant obstacles you have to overcome.”

Sustainability and planning for the future are essential and something that Jason takes very seriously. His crew aboard the Jason D 2000 do their part to manage and protect the lobster fishery by following resource protection plans that are in place.

Jason’s favourite way to enjoy PEI lobster is the old-fashioned way- a cold lobster dinner!

Do You Know Lobster?

A freshly laid lobster egg is the size of the head of a pin (1/16").

True – Lobster Eggs Are Tiny

Lobster eggs are indeed about the size of the head of a pin. A female lobster carries about 8000 eggs inside for 9-12 months, then another 9-12 months under her tail. Fishers have to return lobsters to the water that have visible eggs under their tail as part of fishery conservation methods. And from every 50,000 eggs, only two lobsters are expected to survive to legal size.