Lobster Bisque

Servings: 8

Ingredients:

  • 2 live PEI lobsters (about 1 ½ to 2 lbs each)
  • 2 tsp salt
  • 2 tbsp olive oil
  • 1 large onion, roughly chopped
  • 4 celery stalks, roughly chopped
  • 1 large carrot or 2 medium, peeled and roughly chopped
  • 2 tbsp tomato paste
  • 1/2 cup dry vermouth or sherry
  • 6 sprigs parsley + 2 tbsp roughly chopped parsley
  • 2 bay leaves
  • 6 sprigs thyme
  • 1 tbsp black peppercorns
  • 4 cups fish stock
  • 1/3 cup butter
  • 1/3 cup flour
  • 1 cup 35% cream Salt

Directions:

Fill a large pot with 1-inch water and 2 tsp
salt. Bring to a boil. Add lobsters to the pot
and cover with a lid, once boiling reduce
heat to medium low and let cook for 12
minutes, until shells are bright red. Remove
lobsters from pot, set aside to cool. Reserve
1 cup of strained lobster cooking liquid.

Once lobster shells are cool enough to
handle, carefully remove meat from the
tail and claws, set shells aside. Chop meat
from the body and keep claws intact for
garnish, set aside.

In a large pot heat olive oil over medium
high heat, add onions, celery and carrots.
Cook for 5 minutes, until vegetables start
to soften, stirring often. Add lobster shells
and cook for another 5 minutes. Add tomato
paste, cook for 1-2 minutes. Deglaze pot
with vermouth, cook until liquid reduces by
half. Add parsley sprigs, bay leaves, thyme,
fish stock, 2 cups of water and 1 cup of
reserved lobster cooking liquid. Bring to a
boil over high, once boiling reduce heat to
medium to keep at a simmer. Let simmer
for 45 minutes. Strain lobster stock, discard
vegetables and lobster shells.

Melt butter in a clean large pot over medium
high heat, whisk in flour and cook for 1
-2 minutes. Whisk in strained lobster stock
until it is incorporated and smooth, bring
to a boil and let cook for 2-3 minutes to
slightly thicken. Remove from heat, stir in
cream, season with salt and pepper to taste.

Ladle bisque into bowls, garnish with
chopped lobster meat and tails and
chopped parsley.

Do You Know Lobster?

Whistling on the boat is considered bad luck.

True – Whistling Is Bad Luck

The origins of this superstition are lost in time, but whistling is generally considered to bring bad luck. Some people think that whistling bring stronger winds that can be hazardous to fishers and damage traps and equipment.